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Description of Programs

RESOURCE

In this arrangement, children are enrolled with their peers in a regular classroom, and, depending upon the nature of their difficulty, they are seen by a specially trained teacher for various lengths of time to work on specific academic skills.  Some children may be seen individually by the resource teacher or in small groups.  The extensiveness of contact with the resource teacher will largely depend upon the severity of the child’s difficulty.  The resource teacher is housed in a classroom that is specially equipped to meet the individual student needs.  The resource teacher may also assist student in their regular classroom.

CONTENT MASTERY CENTER

The collaborative effort of the special education teacher/teaching assistant and the regular classroom teacher focuses on helping students learn effectively in the educational mainstream setting.  Content Mastery encourages students to take responsibility for learning.  By using a specially equipped Content Mastery classroom, instruction is supplemented and reinforced.  The special education teacher/teaching assistant operates as a consultant/facilitator and provides a system of developing strategies and procedures for instruction that will accommodate the student so that all content instruction may occur in the regular classroom.

SPEECH THERAPY

Students who have been determined by a certified or licensed speech language pathologist to have a communication disorder may receive articulation or language therapy in their home school.

PRESCHOOL PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES (PPCD)

Three-, four- and five-year olds with disabilities can participate in this instructional program. Students are eligible if they are determined by an interdisciplinary team to exhibit significant delay beyond the accepted variations in normal development in one or more of the following areas:

  • Cognitive;

  • Gross or fine motor;

  • Language or speech;

  • Social or emotional; and

  • Self-help skills.

Referrals are accepted on students from ages two years, nine months to five years.  Deaf or blind children may be eligible for services at birth.

Services for students include assessments; physical, occupational, and speech therapy; activities to develop cognitive and social/emotional and self-help skills; and adaptive equipment and transportation.  Families are served through training and planned coordination of these services.

EXTENDED SCHOOL YEAR SERVICES

Extended School Year (ESY) are provided for students who demonstrate severe regression (substantial loss of critical skills) that requires extensive recoupment (relearning).  The Texas Education Agency selected an eight-week period as the maximum permissible time for recoupment by disabled students and considers anything longer than eight weeks as constituting a severe or substantial regression.  The ARD Committee determines on an individual basis which students require an extended school year.  The primary purpose of ESY is to maintain mastered skills from the previous year’s individualized educational plan.

HOMEBOUND        

The Homebound program is a means of providing a continuation of educational instruction for students who, because of serious illnesses, accidents, etc…, are unable to attend school for an extended period of time (at least four consecutive weeks).  The success of the homebound instructional program for each student relies on the involvement of the homebound teacher, the regular classroom teacher, the student and the student’s parents.

L.I.F.E. SKILLS CLASSES (LIVING INDEPENDENTLY IN FUNCTIONAL ENVIRONMENTS)

These classes serve students with severe disabilities. L.I.F.E. Skills classes prepare these students to perform meaningful activities in a variety of domestic, vocational, recreational and community environments.  The L.I.F.E. Skills teacher utilizes materials and educational equipment necessary for these students to transfer skills learned in the classroom setting to natural environments.

VOCATIONAL ADJUSTMENT CLASS

Vocational Adjustment Class utilizes the environment of the classroom coupled with the community world of work to instruct disabled students to reach their potential.  The classroom/community approach enables a disabled student the opportunity to transfer classroom knowledge to the work community and acquire acceptance and marketable skills necessary to succeed in the competitive job force.

INCLUSION/MAINSTREAM

Students remain in regular classes with support from special education teachers who monitor progress and assist the regular teacher with modifications of tests, materials, and other supports necessary for students to be successful in the regular curriculum.

CO-TEACHING

Regular and special education teachers plan lessons and teach a subject together to a class of special and regular education students.

VISUALLY IMPAIRED

A teacher of visually impaired provides specialized instruction and support to the blind and visually impaired students of the district.  A multi-disciplinary team assesses the student’s cognitive ability, academic achievement, language skills, motor performance, and social/emotional functioning.

DEAF EDUCATION

A teacher of the deaf and hard of hearing provides specialized instruction and support to the eligible students of the district.  The overall objective of the program is to enable these students to communicate effectively so that they will be able to live full and productive lives. 

RELATED SERVICES

Special services are available to help special needs students benefit from their education.  When deemed appropriate by the ARD committee, related services are provided.  Services may include but are not limited to:

  • Audiology

  • Counseling

  • Transportation

  • Physical and occupational therapy

  • Adapted physical education

  • Vision services

  • Augmentative assistive technology

  • Orientation and mobility

WHAT DISABILITY(S) DETERMINE A STUDENT’S ELIGIBILITY FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES IN GISD?

  • Auditory (hearing) impairment
  • Autism
  • Deaf-blind
  • Emotional disturbance
  • Learning disability
  • Mental retardation
  • Multiple disabilities
  • Orthopedic impairment
  • Other health impairment
  • Speech impairment
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Visual impairment

HOW DO YOU DETERMINE IF A CHILD NEEDS SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES?

To receive special education services, a child must meet specific criteria defined by the Texas Education Agency (TEA).  Usually an adult close to the child will notice signs that indicate a possible disability.  Perhaps the child doesn’t respond to sounds, indicating an auditory impairment.  Perhaps the child is lagging behind his peers in motor skills like grasping, crawling or walking.  At this point, the parent or doctor may contact the neighborhood school for assistance.

Each school has a Student Support Team which reviews all information and, if appropriate, refers the student for a Full Individual Evaluation (FIE).  Special education staff administers appropriate assessment to obtain specific information about the child’s strengths and needs.  An Admission, Review and Dismissal (ARD) committee will then review all of the available data, and determine whether a child qualifies for services.  This committee, which includes the parent, administrator, special education teacher, regular education teacher, assessment specialist, and other staff familiar with the student’s needs, makes all decisions concerning the educational program/services of a student referred to or receiving special education support.

WHAT EXACTLY IS THE “ARD” COMMITTEE?

ARD is an acronym for the Admission, Review and Dismissal committee.  This committee, which includes the parent, administrator, teacher, and other staff familiar with the student’s needs, makes all decisions concerning the educational program/services of a student referred to or receiving special education support.